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I think you're wrong (but I'm listening) : a guide to grace-filled political conversations
Book
2019
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Reviews

Library Journal Reviews

This much-needed book from business coach Holland and city commissioner Silvers (Paducah, KY) arrives at a time when many families and friends find themselves on opposite sides of the aisle when discussing political issues. The authors share how to give grace and be vulnerable when addressing topics that affect families and communities. They offer exercises and reflections for keeping conversations productive and flowing as well as unpack the reasons why we feel the way we do—our deeper values and concerns—to assist in honing future conversations around hot-button subjects. VERDICT A must-read and relevant text for anyone talking about today's politics.

Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

Publishers Weekly Reviews

Holland, a former Hillary Clinton campaign staffer, and Silvers, a life and business coach, provide ways for Christians to respectfully engage in political discussions in this instructive guide. The authors, sorority sisters who both attended Transylvania University in Kentucky, began engaging in public Facebook discussions about politics in the aftermath of the 2016 presidential campaign. Holland took a very liberal stance, whereas Silvers is a conservative. Expanding on those discussions, the authors ask readers "to hear each other's thoughts, to test our own beliefs against each other's philosophies, and to better appreciate our own core beliefs by having to articulate and challenge those beliefs." Most of the book sticks to this point and doesn't touch on the underlying disagreements that sparked the authors' initial discussion. This feels like a missed opportunity, especially given their claim that people often spout opinions without researching the facts behind their stances. When the authors do delve into politics, such as in their examination of the history of welfare, they powerfully demonstrate what grace-filled political discussions can look like. Holland and Silvers remind readers that Christian identity doesn't necessarily determine political affiliation. (Feb.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Annotations

Two friends on opposite sides of the aisle provide a practical guide to grace-filled political conversation while challenging readers to put relationship before policy and understanding before argument.

More than ever, politics seems driven by conflict and anger. People sitting together in pews every Sunday have started to feel like strangers, loved ones at the dinner table like enemies. Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers say there is a better way.       

As working moms on opposite ends of the political spectrum and hosts of a fast-growing politics podcast, Holland and Silvers have learned how to practice engaging conversation while disagreeing. In I Think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening), they share principles on how to give grace and be vulnerable when discussing issues that affect families, churches, the country, and the world. They provide practical tools to move past frustration and into productive dialogue, emphasizing that faith should inform the way people engage more than it does the outcome of that engagement. This urgently needed new book reveals how to talk about politics in a way that inspires rather than angers and that pays spiritual dividends far past election day.

- (Thomas Nelson)

Two friends on opposite sides of the aisle provide a practical guide to grace-filled political conversation while challenging readers to put relationship before policy and understanding before argument. - (Thomas Nelson)

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