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Nature's best hope : a new approach to conservation that starts in your yard
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2019
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Reviews

Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* A professor in the department of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware, Tallamy makes the case for developing a 20-million-acre Homegrown National Park—an area larger than the combined acreage of the Everglades, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Teton, Canyonlands, Mount Rainier, North Cascades, Badlands, Olympic, Sequoia, Grand Canyon, Denali, and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks. Such a park could be created if all landowners in America converted just half of their lawns to productive native-plant communities. Tallamy buttresses this fantastical idea with a science-supported, often-gobsmacking explanation of the interconnections between native plants, insects, geography, and the humans and other animals whose lives depend on their high-functioning interplay. The challenge, he says, is to "convince people that, for their own good, they need to value something they do not currently value." For example, understanding the difference in environmental value between introduced and native species, the latter providing as much as 75 percent more of the caterpillar biomass that's critical to bird populations. Or appreciating the value of "keystone plants," oak trees among them, which provide disproportionate support to a local ecosystem and whose loss could be catastrophic. A revelatory guide whose application can begin just outside our doors. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* A professor in the department of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware, Tallamy makes the case for developing a 20-million-acre Homegrown National Park—an area larger than the combined acreage of the Everglades, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Teton, Canyonlands, Mount Rainier, North Cascades, Badlands, Olympic, Sequoia, Grand Canyon, Denali, and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks. Such a park could be created if all landowners in America converted just half of their lawns to productive native-plant communities. Tallamy buttresses this fantastical idea with a science-supported, often-gobsmacking explanation of the interconnections between native plants, insects, geography, and the humans and other animals whose lives depend on their high-functioning interplay. The challenge, he says, is to "convince people that, for their own good, they need to value something they do not currently value." For example, understanding the difference in environmental value between introduced and native species, the latter providing as much as 75 percent more of the caterpillar biomass that's critical to bird populations. Or appreciating the value of "keystone plants," oak trees among them, which provide disproportionate support to a local ecosystem and whose loss could be catastrophic. A revelatory guide whose application can begin just outside our doors. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Library Journal Reviews

Readers of Tallamy's Bringing Nature Home and The Living Landscape (with Rick Darke) will recognize some familiar themes in his most recent offering: How important native plants are to our ecosystems, how our landscaping practices should be more friendly to both wildlife and humans, and how the "renaturing" of our backyards en masse could create a giant wildlife corridor the author calls "Homegrown National Park." Tallamy (entomology, Univ. of Delaware) accentuates practicality and "fixing problems"—such as biodiversity loss, habitat fragmentation, and climate change, and is candid about the obstacles ahead. His plan relies on individual effort, yet, as he acknowledges, millions of people remain "clueless" about nature. Thus he provides some answers in a down-to-earth, personalized style; the use of his own backyard as demonstration lab—"Tallamyland"—and an emphasis on small steps to local ecosystem recovery (removing alien plants, shrinking the lawn, fostering insects, planting oaks and other "keystone" genera). The book's solid organization (including FAQs at the rear) and striking photography also aid his cause. VERDICT Recent reports of massive declines in bird populations across North America make this book both timely and apposite. An essential addition to most gardening collections.—Robert Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont.

Copyright 2020 Library Journal.

Author Biography

Doug Tallamy is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 95 research publications and has taught insect related courses for 39 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book Bringing Nature Home was awarded the 2008 Silver Medal by the Garden Writers' Association. The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, was published in 2014.  Among his awards are the Garden Club of America Margaret Douglas Medal for Conservation and the Tom Dodd, Jr. Award of Excellence, and the 2018 AHS B.Y. Morrison Communication Award. - (Workman Press.)

Annotations

The best-selling author of Bringing Nature Home outlines practical next-step approaches to conservation, instructing homeowners on how to turn yards into supportive wildlife habitats that do not require government regulation. 30,000 first printing. Illustrations. - (Baker & Taylor)

An urgent and heartfelt call for a new approach to conservation&;one that starts in every backyard&;from the New York Times bestselling author of Bringing Nature Home. 
- (Workman Press.)

A New York Times bestseller

Douglas W. Tallamy&;s first book, Bringing Nature Home, awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. In this new book, Tallamy takes the next step and outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation. Nature&;s Best Hope shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats. Because this approach relies on the initiatives of private individuals, it is immune from the whims of government policy. Even more important, it&;s practical, effective, and easy&;you will walk away with specific suggestions you can incorporate into your own yard.

If you&;re concerned about doing something good for the environment, Nature&;s Best Hope is the blueprint you need. By acting now, you can help preserve our precious wildlife&;and the planet&;for future generations.

- (Workman Press.)

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